Posts Tagged ‘learning’

“Love your job!” – Doc Meek

4 Teachers Share Why

They Love Their Work

A rising demand for teachers and a decreased supply is creating a teacher shortage in the U.S. At ReadyJob, we wanted to do something about that. So, in an effort to inspire today’s young people to consider becoming teachers, we decided to highlight the best aspects of the profession. We reached out to teachers and asked them what they found most rewarding about teaching. Below are some of the reasons they gave:

Teachers prepare students for the future 

If you’re not in education, you might think a teacher’s job is about sticking to the books–teaching students the “3 Rs” curriculum used to prepare them for end of grade testing. And that’s certainly part of what they do, but as Doc Meek of DocMeek.com notes they often do much more than that. He wrote in to share why he loves teaching and said it’s because the work gives him “the potential of helping students thrive long-term.” And really, isn’t that exactly what our teachers do? Whether they’re teaching physics or history or a broader life lesson on avoiding drugs or developing conflict resolution skills, our teachers impact their students’ lives long after they leave the classroom.

Teachers help students find their voice 

Teachers are in a unique position to guide students as they grow and learn. And Vanessa Lasdon of Word-Ink.net reminds us that students aren’t just learning about the subjects being taught to them, they’re also learning about themselves.

“While there are countless rewarding aspects to teaching–not the least of which is the incredible education I receive in return each day–above all as an English teacher, I love encouraging my students to find their voice and share it with the world,” says Lasdon. “Learning—like writing—starts with great daring.”

Teachers get to teach students new things

If you’ve never seen a child grasp a new concept for the first time, you’re missing out. Teachers show children the world, opening doors for them that were previously closed. For Jennifer Greenleaf of JenniferGreenleaf.com, opening those doors is one of the things she loves most about her profession.

“The most rewarding aspect of teaching is watching the children around me during their most transformative years learning new skills and applying them,” says Greenleaf. “It’s exciting because, under most circumstances, they’re enjoying what they’re doing and it’s fun coming back to encourage the lessons to continue.”

Teachers help students develop a passion for learning 

Learning shouldn’t stop when you graduate from high school (or even college, for that matter!). Learning should be a lifelong practice, and as Amy Loring of TwoTeachersontheEdge.com notes, teachers are central to helping students develop that appetite.

“To reach every student by connecting and encouraging them daily should be an educator’s goal,” says Loring. “Teaching is not just standing in front of the class spewing information and lecturing, it is to inspire the desire to want to learn and discover even more. Inspiring the love of learning and finding the hidden gifts of each of your students is life altering for both the student and for the teacher. When you show a child what they can be, you really are changing the world. This passion must show, this love of the child and learning has to be your daily purpose.”

As you can see, teachers are asked to do a lot. But through their interactions with students, they get a lot in return. If you’re considering education for your profession, rest assured that there are students out there who need you.

  • Thanks to Erica Francis of ReadyJob.org for this great guest article!
  • Doc Meek, Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canada, the 17th of Ireland, 2017 :O)

 

“Contemplative Pedagogy?” – Doc Meek

Image result for jose alvarez cornett

Jose Alvarez-Cornett

I began teaching a college level course and in my second class I introduced the students to contemplative pedagogy (that is mindfulness meditation). And they, physics students, loved it! 
https://www.hastac.org/u/jose-alvarez-cornett

Thank you, Jose Alvarez-Cornett!

In this world of ours, so obsessed with intellectual content, logic, intellectual reasoning, hard science, and so on, it is refreshing to find someone (Jose Alvarez-Cornett, above) who knows it is also important for all students to think with their heart, to seek peace within as a proven means for more effective learning.

Want to study easier and remember longer?

If you wish fervently to study easier and remember longer, know that your emotional state of mind is a “priming pump for the best flow of water” you can experience as a living, loving lifelong learner!

Peace within = peace without (including important learning tasks).

Doc Meek, Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canada, Sat, Oct 22, 2016

P.S. People who say that “contemplative pedagogy” or “mindfulness meditation” is a religion and have no place in public institutions of learning know neither the learning capability of the human mind, nor what religion is.

“Cooperative and Active Learning.” – Rob Plevin

 HARMIN, Merrill (1995), Inspiring Active Learning 
Image from: Amazon.com
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Today I am full of  gratitude for the high impact that cooperative and active learning have for students. I am also grateful for my cyber colleague, Rob Plevin, and my dear friend Merrill Harmin, who encourage all students to be more active in their own learning processes and in overcoming their own learning difficulties.  – Doc Meek, Sherwood Park, Alberta, CANADA, Fri, Aug 16, 2013 

P.S. Nice to get your great newsletter below, Rob!

30MinuteADHDConsultations_440x100

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Dear Doc,

Our summer sale bonanza is coming to an end very soon.

We only have one more product to run at discount plus another ‘secret’ product which I may announce very soon (you don’t want to miss that one if we do decide to run it).

For now, the product we have at HALF OFF is…

Cooperative and Active Learning in Lessons

…and it’s on sale for just THREE MORE DAYS – until Monday 19th August.

This is actually one of my favourite resources – I loved putting this together because it contains a lot of the activities that my students enjoyed when I used to teach. In fact, the activities are so good, I now use them in our live courses and workshops.

The activities are suitable for practically any age group and any subject – with minimal adaptation – and you’ll find them PERFECT if you’re looking for ways to…

  • Get students working together cooperatively (Hint: this is one of the EASIEST ways to reduce behaviour problems and improve participation – even bored, switched off students get a huge kick from working like this).
  • Put more ACTIVITY in your lessons – you’ve no-doubt heard that a large proportion of ‘troublesome’ students tend to be kinesthetic learners. If you try and teach these students using didactic, lecture-style methods they will HATE it! The way to make subjects accessible and appealing to these students is to include some activity in the learning tasks – get them on their feet and ‘doing’ stuff. These activities will enable you to make any subject more ‘hands-on’.
  • Make subject content STICK – It’s obvious, when students are truly engaged in the learning process there is much more chance that the information you give them will actually be remembered. The activities in this resource will give you countless ways to INVOLVE all your students in fun, interactive ways they will LOVE.

The pack includes:

  • Cooperative and active learning templates and activities
  • Fun grouping tips
  • Instructions for managing super-enjoyable and successful group work sessions
  • Active teaching strategies
  • Editable print-ready resource templates
  • Novel ideas for getting ALL your students involved
  • And much much more…

Click here to get your copy for HALF OFF (three more days only)

Best wishes,

Rob Plevin

PS remember, our sale is coming to an end very, very soon so this is your last chance to take advantage of the other products on sale here.
Behaviour Needs LTD

First Floor Offices
North Friarages, Frairgate
Penrith, Cumbria
CA11 7XR
Great Britain

“Teaching can get in the way of learning.” – Doc Meek

Saturday, October 27, 2012: Today I am grateful for those who jog our minds about how we learn (and teach)! – Doc Meek

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Text below was posted in: TENNESSEE TEACHING AND LEARNING CENTER BLOG on June 13, 2012.

LINK: http://tenntlc.utk.edu/2012/06/13/what-works-in-student-learning-and-what-gets-in-the-way-teaching-the-chronicle-of-higher-education/

What Works in Student Learning, and

What Gets in the Way – Teaching –

The Chronicle of Higher Education

The Chronicle reviewed a recent conference on student learning, sponsored by the Teagle Foundation,  What Works in Student Learning, and What Gets in the Way – Teaching – The Chronicle of Higher Education.  Attendants considered the state of student learning in higher education.

Among their suggestions: Students should be active in constructing their own learning, and activities should stimulate not just their intellects but their emotions.

As often happens, the comments are as interesting as the article.  Among the comments are questions serving students with disabilities as well as a bit of debate about “learning” versus “teaching.”  A large amount of comments point out that what was said at the conference has been well-established and said before.

This is true.  However, we who are currently teaching in higher education are at different stages–and with different training to support our skills at teaching.  New assistant professors may or may not have had graduate training in teaching and learning theories and in pedagogical practice.  There is some interesting research (and hopefully there will be more) that shows the more professors know teaching and learning principles and understand student learning, the more successful they are at evaluating and improving their courses (Milton & Lyons, 2003).

For new professors, the amount of teacher preparation is changing as more universities establish graduate teaching certification programs.  These programs allow those students who are not in departments that traditionally provide a lot of support (graduate students in Language and English programs, for instance, teach a lot and usually are provided with a lot of training by their home departments).  For others, though, they may start their first job with no training or experience in teaching! For the rest of us, most midsize and large institutions have teaching and learning centers to provide ongoing support.

We in academia are slow to change (are you shocked by this statement?)  We honor traditions, yet the traditional lecture is slowly being replaced by “active lecturing” in which students get involved or by active learning in the classroom, in which the lecture is minimized or moved out of the in-class session entirely (as in the flipped classroom).   This movement to change our pedagogical practice is slow but follows decades of research on promoting student learning, as the conference participants noted.

Finally, our students have changed (again, not a shock to point this out).  They have changed in response to our culture and cultural priorities, our uses of technology, our economy, and other changes in the West (I want to be careful to distinguish between a U.S. university and those in developing countries).

Much of our professional lives have remained the same–we balance research and teaching and service, in proportions dependent on our type of school.  For some of us, our teaching in and of itself has not changed.  However, job security has lessened, demands on our time have increased, student expectations have changed, and public expectations have increased.  However we address these issues, we must remind our stakeholders that we are teaching always the new generation.  What will our culture do to support our mission in higher ed?

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Thank you, TENNESSEE TEACHING AND LEARNING CENTER at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, for teaching us how to teach better!

Doc Meek, Sat, Oct 27, 2012, Sherwood Park, Alberta, CANADA

“What if you are smarter than you think?”

J. Collins Meek, Ph.D. (Doc Meek)
Trusted Learning/Teaching Guide
[“Everyone” says: “Fun to work with.”]
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THE LEARNING CLINIC WORLDWIDE, INC. 

CANADA: Dr. Meek (587) 400-4707, Edmonton, AB

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For optimum brain health, ensure your heart health:  

More on heart health: http://www.themeekteam.info

USA: Jeannette (801) 971-1812; South Jordan, Utah

CANADA: Jeannette (587) 333-6923, Calgary, Alberta

CANADA: P.O. Box 3105, Sherwood Park, AB T8H 2T1

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“Learning is the only thing…” -T.H. White

Tuesday, November16, 2010. Today I am grateful for education and learning, and the touch of humor that can take us further in our learning than we thought possible.

A green taxi at Arlington, Virginia. Hybrid taxis are becoming common in major cities around the world; image and text from Wikipedia:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taxicab

Reader’s Digest, September 2010, page 49 gives learning and humor a boost:

“Got that? I think everyone should go to college and get a degree, and then spend six months as a bartender and six months as a cabdriver. Then they would really be educated. – Al McGuire, basketball coach and commentator”

Further, from the same issue of Reader’s Digest, page 49:

“Education is when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don’t.- Pete Seeger”

“The whole purpose of education is to turn mirrors into windows. – Sydney J. Harris”

“Education is a progressive discovery of our own ignorance. – Will Durant”

“Education is what survives when what has been learned has been forgotten. – B.F. Skinner.”

Thank you, Reader’s Digest!

Here’s to educators and learners and thinkers!

All three in one?

Doc Meek, Tuesday, November 16, 2010, at Strathcona Country Library, Sherwood Park, Alberta, CANADA

J. Collins Meek, Ph.D. (Doc Meek)
“What if you are smarter than you think?”
Learning Specialist http://docmeek.com

For brain health, ensure heart health (short video):
http://www.amiraclemolecule.com/themeekteam
More on heart health http://www.themeekteam.info
Ph (801) 971-1812 (Jeannette); Fax [801] 282-6026

THE LEARNING CLINIC WORLDWIDE, INC.
CANADA: P.O. Box 3105, Sherwood Park, AB T8H 2T1
TONGA: Mele Taumoepeau, P.O. Box 60, Nuku’alofa
USA: 3688 W 9800 S, #138, South Jordan, UT 84095

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“Cry, eat, crawl, walk, run, fly.” – Doc Meek

Monday, September 27, 2010. I am grateful for people who remind us that learning new skills needs to be done in order, generally speaking.

Image from:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s1-Fo7uQlrY&feature=related

“He who would learn to fly one day must first learn to stand and walk and run and climb and dance; one cannot fly into flying.”

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900); scholar, writer, philosopher; quote from: http://www.Values.com

Thank you, Friedrich!

Doc Meek,  Monday, September 27, 2010, at Edmonton, Alberta, CANADA

J. Collins Meek, Ph.D. (Doc Meek)
“What if you are smarter than you think?”
Learning Specialist http://docmeek.com

For brain health, ensure heart health (short video):
http://www.amiraclemolecule.com/themeekteam
More on heart health http://www.themeekteam.info
Ph (801) 971-1812 (Jeannette); Fax [801] 282-6026

THE LEARNING CLINIC WORLDWIDE, INC.
CANADA: P.O. Box 3105, Sherwood Park, AB T8H 2T1
TONGA: Mele Taumoepeau, P.O. Box 60, Nuku’alofa
USA: 3688 W 9800 S, #138, South Jordan, UT 84095

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“Ask me anything.” – Doc Meek

Thursday, August 12, 2010. Today I am grateful that I have had more than thirty (30) years of great experience with almost all aspects of education and learning. They call me the “the brain guy.” – Doc Meek

People are always asking me questions about teaching, learning, and how the brain operates. And how the school systems operate.

I am delighted to answer any and all questions! 😮

So this is an open invitation to all of you who are parents, teachers, students, or educational administrators:

“Ask me anything”

I learned that phrase from my internet mentor, Connie Ragen Green. She teaches people how to be a business success on the internet, like she is. She is a great teacher/learner. Kind, considerate, and patiently able to explain answers to all questions, including the “dumb questions” people are almost afraid to ask. That’s Connie.

“There are no dumb questions, ” Connie says, and she practices what she preaches. And she keeps learning. She never stops learning. I think that is one reason she is such a good teacher. She is a good student as well. Thank you Connie! I am grateful for your example.

Same invitation from Doc: “Ask me anything.”

“Ask me anything about education, training, the brain, the mind, behavior, emotion, teaching, teacher training, student learning problems, and so on.”

I have had extensive training and experience with almost all aspects of education and learning, including the administrative and financial aspects. (See my Qualifications Brief by clicking on the date of July 15, 2010, on the calendar on the right-hand side of the screen when you first visit THE LEARNING CLINIC WORLDWIDE blog at

http://docmeek.com

There is almost nothing about education, learning or the brain that you can ask me, about which I have not had some degree of familiarity.

You can ask me with confidence and I will respond with both knowlege and compassion. If I don’t know the answer I will find it for you.

And even a little humor may go a long way, eh?

Years ago, a Calgary magazine reported:

“Dr. Meek brings a unique blend of warmth, intelligence and humor to everything he does.” Thank you, Calgary!

If you have any questions or comments, just click on the little blue word “comments” at the bottom right-hand side of this article, and a form will appear that you can use to ask any question you wish.

Doc Meek, Thursday, August 12, 2010, at Nose Hill Public Library in Calgary, Alberta, CANADA.

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J. Collins Meek, Ph.D. (Doc Meek)
“What if you are smarter than you think?”
Learning Specialist http://docmeek.com

For brain health, ensure heart health (short video):
http://www.amiraclemolecule.com/themeekteam
More on heart health http://www.themeekteam.info
Ph (801) 971-1812 (Jeannette); Fax [801] 282-6026

THE LEARNING CLINIC WORLDWIDE, INC.
CANADA: P.O. Box 3105, Sherwood Park, AB T8H 2T1
TONGA: Mele Taumoepeau, P.O. Box 60, Nuku’alofa
USA: 3688 W 9800 S, #138, South Jordan, UT 84095

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Learning is just as important for girls as for boys

Wednesday, August 4, 2010. My oldest daughter’s birthday today! She’s all grown up, married, has two children, and left home long ago. 😮 Happy birthday, Tanya! And many more!

Tanya and her two daughters; photo from Facebook:  http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/photo.php?pid=1167193&op=1&o=global&view=global&subj=583987065&id=711955527&fbid=27865975527

Learning to love learning

Tanya is a good example of the importance of loving learning. If you don’t want to fall in love with learning, that’s OK. Just learn to enjoy it. If you don’t enjoy it now, find a way–somehow–to learn to make it easier for yourself to study more efficiently and to remember longer. You can do it, believe me.

That’s what I teach my students in my private practice at THE LEARNING CLINIC WORLDWIDE. When you learn to enjoy learning, or at least to enjoy becoming more competent, it will stand you in good stead your whole life through.

Tanya finished high school with good grades and went on to nursing school to pursue and obtain her RN (Registered Nurse) Certificate. Later, she completed her bachelor’s degree in nursing.

When she worked “up north,” as we say in Canada (it’s actually “down north,” in terms of elevation), she was both nurse and “doctor” in the sense that she was the only “medical” person for many miles around. She provided great service in Canada’s north.

Later, in more turbulent times

Later, when she was going through a “rough patch” in her life, she was so grateful to have secured post-secondary qualifications, as she was able to provide sufficient income to more than just survive.

So, pay attention girls. You never know what life will bring. Get all the education and/or training that you can and you will always congratulate yourself for looking after your future self as best you could.

When the going gets tough in your schooling, get help. Fortunately there is usually an abundance of help of all kinds for people who are trying to better themselves through advanced education or training.

To the best that is in you, girls!

Blessings, Doc Meek, Wednesday, August 4, 2010, at South Jordan, Utah ———————————–

J. Collins Meek, Ph.D. (Doc Meek)
“What if you are smarter than you think?”
Learning Specialist http://docmeek.com

For brain health, ensure heart health (short video):
http://www.amiraclemolecule.com/themeekteam
More on heart health http://www.themeekteam.info
Ph (801) 971-1812 (Jeannette); Fax [801] 282-6026

THE LEARNING CLINIC WORLDWIDE, INC.
CANADA: P.O. Box 3105, Sherwood Park, AB T8H 2T1
TONGA: Mele Taumoepeau, P.O. Box 60, Nuku’alofa
USA: 3688 W 9800 S, #138, South Jordan, UT 84095

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“Reading . . . worth mastering forever.” – Doc Meek

“I’ve always loved reading.” – Doc Meek

I found that reading takes me into realms of knowledge about people, places and things . . .  and everything! I can soar to the moon and on to the cosmos, plummet the depths of the sea, and do everything in between.

And I can go backwards and forwards in time, and remain in the moment of now if I want to.

“Paying attention to now is a gift. That’s why they call it the present.” 😮

Who gave me this quotation (I can’t remember right now)?

I can read slow and savor. I can read fast and furious [speed, not affect 😮 ]. Or I can read a mile a minute, if I have to. If I want to. (Using Photoreading, courtesy of my friend Dr. Paul Scheele and The Learning Strategies Corporation).

Fun to read a big book in 10 – 12   minutes, eh?

A guest blog from Sean Stephenson

Just got an email from Sean Stephenson on the topic of reading. I enjoy his blithe spirit.

Here’s Sean’s article from his blog (copy and paste Sean’s URL below into your computer’s browser line to access his website):

http://www.livingatcause.com/blog/563/readers-are-leaders/

June 10, 2010

Readers Are Leaders

Written by Sean Stephenson in Inspiration

Reading is an invaluable asset that helps us shape our thoughts and actions. By reading, we can unlock our true potential at earth-shattering speeds.

When we allow ourselves to be immersed in new ideas and foreign concepts, we expose our minds to a new way of thinking.  These new perspectives help us gain a competitive advantage over others – and the best part about it, is reading is virtually free! (other than our time of course. :o).

“The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.” – Dr. Seuss

So read more, grow your imagination and invest in your future. I guarantee you won’t regret it. On that note, here’s my list of book recommendations:

  • The Magic of Believing by Claude M. Bristol
  • The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
  • The Four Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz
  • One Small Step by Robert Maurer
  • As a Man Thinketh by James Allen
  • Mastery by George Burr
  • Get Off Your But by Sean Stephenson 😮

Love life,
Sean

P.S. Please leave some of your own recommendations in the comments!  I’d so love to hear them.

Above guest article from Sean’s blog (copy and paste Sean’s URL below into your computer’s browser line to access his website):

http://www.livingatcause.com/blog/563/readers-are-leaders/

Blessings, Doc Meek, June 10, 2010

At Sherwood Park, Alberta, CANADA; not at South Jordan, Utah, USA

P.S. Like Sean says:

Please leave some of your own book recommendations in the comments!  I’d so love to hear them!

“If you laugh, you change . . . “

All learning involves change of some sort, and all change involves learning of some sort. As a learning specialist, I have always been intrigued by this mutuality. However I have not seen the following quotation until now.

“If you laugh – you change; and when you change – the world changes.” – Shilpa Shah

http://www.lillyarts.com/assets/images/Laughingboy.jpg

Lilly Fluger: <www.lillyarts.com/html/puzzle025.html> ………………………………………………………………………………………..

This quotation reminded me of the famous book entitled Anatomy of an Illness by Norman Cousins. Published years ago now, Norman was the first person of which I am aware that first brought to my attention the healing powers of laughter.

In Anatomy of an Illness, Norman tells us of his chronic disease from which he could not seem to get any relief from pain. Wikipedia reports that he developed a recovery program incorporating megadoses of Vitamin C along with a positive attitude, love, faith, hope, and laughter induced by Marx Brothers films.

Norman reported: “I made the joyous discovery that ten minutes of genuine belly laughter . . . would give me at least two hours of pain-free sleep.”

What has laughter got to do with learning?

Laughter not only releases people from physical pain, it also releases people from emotional pain. Many students in classrooms and children in homes may be in emotional pain of which we may not even be aware. A steady hand on the rudder and a sense of humor as we sail on in life in the classroom and in the home (or in the workplace for that matter) can go far to ease the hidden emotional sore spots and pains.

In critical situations in the classroom or in the home, many a day has been saved by the teacher or the parent seeing the humor in the heat of turmoil, threat or anger. Many an explosive situation has been defused by the adult in the case resorting to humor instead of retaliation or force. This is not easy. With kindness aforethought, it is do-able.

Sometimes, even the student or the child can be the leader, can lead the adult  in seeing the humor that can lighten the load of both.

Of course humor and laughter responses in tough scenarios need to be thought about, practiced, and developed in advance. If we are open to humor and have done some thinking about it, and practicing with it in calm seas, it may arise and bail us out when we least expect it–and most need it–in rough seas.

If good humor and laughter are used as everyday things, practiced as part of the ordinary teaching-learning patterns in classrooms and in homes, they can make a huge difference in learning, both for students and teachers alike.

“At the height of laughter, the universe is flung into a kaleidoscope of new possibilities.”  – Jean Houston

Humor knows no equal when it is used to respond to insults.

Abraham Lincoln [a man with an ugly visage, we are told] was called a “two-faced liar” in a very public forum. He paused a moment, took a deep breath, and responded:

“I submit to you . . .  if I were two-faced, would I be wearing this one?” The house roared with laughter and the danger was gone.

Blessings,

Doc Meek, May 24, 2010, at Sherwood Park, Alberta, CANADA

P.S.  And finally, for teachers and parents who bear a heavy load, Abraham Lincoln lifts our burdens with these poignant words:

“With the fearful strain that is on me night and day, if I did not laugh I should die.”

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