Posts Tagged ‘learning disabilities’

“And Now… The Rest of the Story…” – Paul Harvey

“What if you are smarter than you think?”

                   J. Collins Meek, Ph.D. (Doc Meek)
                   Your Trusted Learning-Teaching Guide
……………………………………………………………………….

Why is Doc Meek so enthusiastic?

You may recall the radio personality, Paul Harvey, from many years ago now? He would do an intriguing “setup” or introductory preamble that would grab your attention, and then he would invite his rapt audience to hear “the rest of the story” after the station break.

Then he would come back on the air with enthusiasm and say, “And now… the rest of the story!” 🙂

And so… readers have asked me to tell the more about why I am so enthusiastic about rescuing children from the emotional turmoil of their learning disabilities, or as I prefer to say:

Helping children triumph over their emotional pain, and have fun overcoming their learning difficulties or learning differences.

After all, it is much easier to workaround a learning difficulty or a learning difference, then it is to struggle endlessly with a seemingly fixed learning disability.

Right?

There is much more hope in playing with a learning difficulty or a learning difference.

Up the Ladder of “Success”

As I worked on my education degrees, I also worked at becoming an all around educator.

I was a special education teacher, a cross-cultural teacher, a regular school teacher, a school principal, a superintendent of schools, a provincial department of education consultant.

One day, when I was working on a policy statement for a senior official in the provincial department of education, I thought, “Where are the children?”

I had “signed up” to teach children and here I was in the administrative world of education–great work–and where was the direct work with children?

Besides, as I went up through the ranks I could not escape noticing that so many children were suffering in anguish because they either could not learn to read in grade one, or were struggling somewhere along in the grades.

Going “Backwards” into Private Practice

So I made a decision to go into private practice to help kids (and adults) overcome learning difficulties. I was terrified to “go it alone” like this, as I was used to “a regular monthly paycheck.”

It worked out just fine.

I respected the teachers who were trying so hard to help all the kids. And I especially honored the mothers who wanted success for their kids in school with all their hearts and souls.

The mothers “carried the freight” alright and I wanted to help lighten that burden if I could!

I never looked back!

I showed kids face-to-face that they were smarter than they thought!

I also showed teachers and parents how to help their students and children how to use not only their brains, but to remember that we need all of the “4-H’s” to make studying easier and remembering longer:

HEAD/HEART/HANDS/HOPE need connecting for true learning to occur.

Doc Meek, Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canada, Sat, Dec 6, 2014

 

 

“Why do you work so hard to help kids overcome learning difficulties?” – Readers

“What if you are smarter than you think?”

                   J. Collins Meek, Ph.D. (Doc Meek)
                   Your Trusted Learning-Teaching Guide
………………………………………………………………

Why do I work so hard to help kids?

Many people have asked me, “What got you into the work of helping children and adults overcome learning difficulties of all kinds? How did you become a neurological learning specialist?”
 .
To digress for a moment:
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I prefer to use the words “learning difficulties” rather than “learning disabilities” because “difficulties” seem to encourage hope (if you work on your difficulties, you can probably overcome them). Whereas, “disabilities” seem to denote something permanent, like a crippled leg or something that is not easy to overcome.

So how did I get started?

I guess people are curious to know my career history, especially after they find out that I was very successful all the way through all of my schooling, right from grade 1 through to my postgraduate degrees.
 .
They wonder why I would care so much about struggling students when I had no experience with that myself.
 .
 Maybe a seed was planted when I was five years old. I got rheumatic fever and I was too sick to go into grade one with my friends. So my mom homeschooled me all the way through that grade one year. She was intelligent and a good teacher, so I did well, but perhaps I did feel a little bit of an “outsider,” being isolated from my friends at school.
.
I do know that kids struggling in school sometimes feel like an “outsider,” alone and isolated in their anguish. Maybe later I resonated with having had some of that anguish when I was young.
.

I didn’t know what career to pursue

When I finished my grade 12 year, I wondered what I should take at University.

I loved the English language, and loved being a member of the debating club, so I thought I might make a good lawyer. I didn’t want to be a corporate lawyer. Too dry and dusty I thought. 🙂

I wanted to be a trial lawyer, to handle what I thought would be exciting litigation work in the courtroom. Dramatic arguments in front of the jury and all that. 🙂

But then I was concerned that if I went into criminal law, I might end up accepting tainted or stolen money in order to earn a living. So I set that aside.

I was drawn to the world of healing (perhaps because I was so sick when I was younger), so I wondered if I should try to get into medical school. My Dad, a journeyman electrician, had a modest income and I felt that even if I worked hard to earn extra money (which I was doing all along), I could probably not afford the high tuition fees demanded by medical schools.

I did not want to run up a $200,000 student debt as some of my friends were proposing to do. (The equivalent medical student loan now runs to $350,000 – $400,000, I’m told.)

Yes, I could repay the debt out of my future physician income, but I have always been pretty cautious about debt.

(A friend of mine ran up a huge student loan debt, and then was struck down with an extremely rare medical condition and was unable to finish his medical degree, so he was/is “toast” in terms of income, both present and future.)

As my dear friend said: “It’s difficult to predict… especially the future.” :O

What would have the most impact long-term?

I thought about the impact of being a good lawyer, or being a good doctor, and I felt that the effects of my work with my clients or patients might, in one sense, be relatively short-lived.

Because it began to dawn on me (maybe because of something I was reading) that teaching, even though it wasn’t necessarily well-paying, could have long-term or even permanent effects if done well. All through mortality perhaps, and maybe even on into eternity if I turned out to be an outstandingly inspirational teacher. 🙂

Provided the students were learning well. And loved learning.

I was always such a learning sponge, voracious reader, knowledge “addict,” and ultimately an enthusiastic lifelong learner, that I wanted that for everybody I guess!

I became a fiery advocate of lifelong learning for all, and I realized that for struggling kids in school, that wouldn’t happen if they were learning to hate learning.

All kids should have a chance to love learning!

Doc Meek, Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canada, Nov 25, 2014

“What if you’re smarter than you think?” – Doc Meek

Thursday, May 10, 2012. Today, I am grateful for parents, teachers & students who endure.  – Doc Meek

Do You or Your Student or Your Child Have Reading Difficulties or Learning Difficulties? 

What if you are smarter than you think?

Einstein had overwhelming learning difficulties at school, and look at the creativity and accomplishment he brought to his life.

strange-albert-einstein.jpg

Click for image of Einstein: http://www.ideachampions.com/weblogs/archives/2011/09/the_timeless_wi.shtml

A series of articles to help mothers, teachers & students with reading problems is at: docmeek.com/mothers

Doc Meek, Thurs, May 10, 2012, Sherwood Park, Alberta, CANADA

“What if you are smarter than you think?”

J. Collins Meek, Ph.D. (Doc Meek)
Neurological Learning Specialist/Facilitator
[“Everyone” says: “He’s fun to work with.”]

         https://docmeek.com

THE LEARNING CLINIC WORLDWIDE, INC.

CANADA: Dr. Meek (587) 400-4707, Edmonton, AB

TONGA: Mele Taumoepeau, P.O. Box 81, Nuku’alofa

USA: Dr. Meek (801) 738-3763, South Jordan, Utah

For optimum brain health, ensure your heart health:

More on heart health: http://www.themeekteam.info

USA: Jeannette (801) 971-1812; South Jordan, Utah

CANADA: Jeannette (587) 333-6923, Calgary, Alberta

CANADA: P.O. Box 3105, Sherwood Park, AB T8H 2T1

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Learning Differences Month (October)

Art Gallery

A Rose

A Rose

By: Ryan , Age 17, Hurst, Texas

Rose image from: http://www.ldonline.org/kidsart/A_Rose

From “LD Online”: The world’s leading website on Learning Disabilities and ADHD: http://www.ldonline.org/calendar/ld

Learning Disabilities Awareness [Learning Differences Awareness] Month (October)

Explore below for:

Learning Disabilities Awareness Month [October in CANADA and the USA] is a time where people pay particular attention to children and adults with learning disabilities [learning differences]. During this month, LD OnLine asks each of you to teach one person something new about learning disabilities [learning differences]. You could, for example, introduce them to our newsletter or share an interesting article using the “Email” icon (located in the top right corner of every page).

Information on Learning Disabilities [Learning Differences]

Read A Primer on Learning Disabilities to find out what a learning disability [learning difference] is, what the different types of learning disabilities [learning differences] are, and what causes them.

Read these short articles to learn more about the specific types of learning disabilities [learning differences]:

Our glossary defines the vocabulary of special education.

Our timeline tells the history of learning disabilities.

Back to Top

Fun Activities

Send an e-card to a teacher. The school year has just begun and an e-card about how a teacher has helped your child should get the year off to a great start.

Read a children’s book aloud to a child you know.

Visit our kids’ art gallery. Encourage your child to draw or paint a picture and submit it here.

Visit Sparktop, a website where kids with learning disabilities (or who learn differently) can create things, play games, connect with other kids, and discover new ways to succeed in school …and life.

Back to Top

Inspirational Stories

Here are some success stories about overcoming disabilities to give hope and inspire solutions for similar problems you may be experiencing:

How the special education system helped her child

How a doctor overcame a non-verbal learning disability to pass her medical boards

A person with dyslexia explains why he loves “reading” audio books

How learning about the label of “learning disabilities” helped a college student understand herself

How planning skills helped a man succeed in college, and on the job, despite his learning disabilities

Back to Top

More About Learning Disabilities

Our LD Topics section tells you how to help children learn math,writing and spellingreading, and how to study. You also can find out about:

Here are some other helpful articles:

Subscribe to our free LD Online Monthly Newsletter and Daily NewsLine to receive up-to-date resources and headlines on learning disabilities.

Back to Top

History and Future of LD Awareness Month

October was originally designated in the United States as LD Month in 1985 through a proclamation by President Ronald Reagan. Learning Disabilities Association of Canada has celebrated an LD Month since 1987 and provides a toolkit to help you celebrate. For many years, learning disabilities organizations in the United States used the month to inform the public about learning disabilities through events and proclamations. LD Month is still commemorated in a few states. LD OnLine is considering a plan for public education in LD Month next year. Please contact us if you formally celebrated LD month this year, using “Positive side of LD” as your subject. We may feature your ideas next year.

Back to Top

Thanks to all those who help children and adults with learning challenges!

Doc Meek, Fri, Oct 14, 2011, Sherwood Park, Alberta, CANADA

Learning Disabilities [Learning Differences] Month (October)

Saturday, October 8, 2011. Today I am grateful for the many people who are helping children and adults with with learning differences (often called learning disabilities, which is not exactly how I see these learning challenges that can contain gifts). ~ Doc Meek

Learning Disabilities

Image from: http://www.goodblogger.net/2011/09/11/learning-disabilities/

………………………………

From “LD Online”: The world’s leading website on Learning Disabilities and ADHD: http://www.ldonline.org/calendar/ld

Learning Disabilities Awareness [Learning Differences Awareness] Month (October)

Explore below for:

Learning Disabilities Awareness Month [October in CANADA and the USA] is a time where people pay particular attention to children and adults with learning disabilities [learning differences]. During this month, LD OnLine asks each of you to teach one person something new about learning disabilities [learning differences]. You could, for example, introduce them to our newsletter or share an interesting article using the “Email” icon (located in the top right corner of every page).

Information on Learning Disabilities [Learning Differences]

Read A Primer on Learning Disabilities to find out what a learning disability [learning difference] is, what the different types of learning disabilities [learning differences] are, and what causes them.

Read these short articles to learn more about the specific types of learning disabilities [learning differences]:

Our glossary defines the vocabulary of special education.

Our timeline tells the history of learning disabilities.

Back to Top

Fun Activities

Send an e-card to a teacher. The school year has just begun and an e-card about how a teacher has helped your child should get the year off to a great start.

Read a children’s book aloud to a child you know.

Visit our kids’ art gallery. Encourage your child to draw or paint a picture and submit it here.

Visit Sparktop, a website where kids with learning disabilities (or who learn differently) can create things, play games, connect with other kids, and discover new ways to succeed in school …and life.

Back to Top

Inspirational Stories

Here are some success stories about overcoming disabilities to give hope and inspire solutions for similar problems you may be experiencing:

How the special education system helped her child

How a doctor overcame a non-verbal learning disability to pass her medical boards

A person with dyslexia explains why he loves “reading” audio books

How learning about the label of “learning disabilities” helped a college student understand herself

How planning skills helped a man succeed in college, and on the job, despite his learning disabilities

Back to Top

More About Learning Disabilities

Our LD Topics section tells you how to help children learn math,writing and spellingreading, and how to study. You also can find out about:

Here are some other helpful articles:

Subscribe to our free LD Online Monthly Newsletter and Daily NewsLine to receive up-to-date resources and headlines on learning disabilities.

Back to Top

History and Future of LD Awareness Month

October was originally designated in the United States as LD Month in 1985 through a proclamation by President Ronald Reagan. Learning Disabilities Association of Canada has celebrated an LD Month since 1987 and provides a toolkit to help you celebrate. For many years, learning disabilities organizations in the United States used the month to inform the public about learning disabilities through events and proclamations. LD Month is still commemorated in a few states. LD OnLine is considering a plan for public education in LD Month next year. Please contact us if you formally celebrated LD month this year, using “Positive side of LD” as your subject. We may feature your ideas next year.

Back to Top

Thanks to all those who help children and adults with learning challenges!

Doc Meek, Sat, Oct 8, 2011, South Jordan, Utah, USA

“Music empowers people with LD.” ~ Pang Hin Yue

Friday, August 26, 2011. Today I am so grateful for those who are inspired to  teach those who don’t learn as easily as others.  Brian John Lim is such a teacher. ~ Doc Meek

Music to empower people with learning

disabilities [Learning Differences]

By PANG HIN YUE, published in The Star Online, Wed, Aug 24, 2011

Former child prodigy Brian John Yim reaches out to the learning disabled and helps autistic teenager Umar Hasfizal realise his potential as a singer with his debut album.

WHEN he was four years old, Brian John Yim’s father left him and his younger brother with their mother and took everything away except an organ. The very object of his sadness became his source of comfort and inspiration. “The organ was the only connection I had with my dad,” says Yim. With no money for piano lessons but an ear for music, he would listen and play the organ as his mother and grandmother sang along.

By the time he turned eight, his mother, Gan Lee Yong, an insurance agent then, had saved enough money for him to take up piano. He was so good that he leapfrogged to fifth grade. Within two years, he completed the final eighth grade. But the child prodigy wanted more – to pursue a course on Electone (electronic organs produced by Yamaha).

Father and son: Hasfizal Mukhtar with Umar. ‘Your child can still be successful even with a disability,’ says Hasfizal.

But staying in Mentakab, a small town in Pahang, did not help. “There was no organ teacher in Mentakab,” recalls the 28-year-old. Undeterred, he decided to learn it at a Yamaha school in Kuala Lumpur. So for one year, every Sunday, he would faithfully take a two-hour bus ride on his own to KL to attend a 45-minute lesson and then hop on the next available bus to go back home.

By 12, he passed his Electone exam, an achievement few can boast of.

To make sure he did not lose out academically, Yim poured his heart into his studies – just as he did with music – scoring straight-As. When he wasn’t studying, the brilliant boy could be found performing at social functions in his hometown.

Image and text above from: http://thestar.com.my/lifestyle/story.asp?file=/2011/8/24/lifefocus/9325519&sec=lifefocus

……………………………

Thank you, Brian John Yim, for inspiring us to help those who need help to be successful learning in their own right! Active teaching and active learning are a winning combination!

Doc Meek, Fri, Aug 26, 2011, Sherwood Park, Alberta, CANADA

“Fluoridation neurotoxic for infants.” ~ Doc Meek

Wednesday, December 29, 2010. Today I am grateful for those who are willing to speak out about the questionable practice of  fluoridation of drinking water. Specifically, those such as Dr. Paul Connett, who let us know that the fluoride put into our drinking water supplies by many municipal authorities is a toxic waste product from the aluminum manufacturing industry.

Supporting your baby’s healthy immune system

Image from: http://www.gerber.com/birth/nutrition_and_feeding/supporting_your_babys_healthy_immune_system.aspx

Parents Should be Warned: Fluoridated Water is Not Recommended for Infants

Contacts:
Paul Connett, Director of FAN, at media@fluoridealert.org
Stuart Cooper, FAN’s Campaign Director at stuart@fluoridealert.org

A new study confirms infants fed formula reconstituted with fluoridated water are at greater risk of developing discolored teeth (dental fluorosis). (1) The American Dental Association (ADA) warned dentists about this in 2006 but has done little or nothing to inform the nearly 200 million Americans who live in communities with fluoridated drinking water.

The study by Levy et al., a Journal of the American Dental Association cover story (October 2010), confirms Levy’s earlier studies, which show “[F]luoride intakes during each of the first 4 years were individually significantly related to fluorosis on maxillary central incisors, with the first year most important,” and that “[I]nfant formulas reconstituted with higher fluoride water can provide 100 to 200 times more fluoride than breastmilk, or cow’s milk.” (2, 3)

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), 32% of American children have dental fluorosis, an increase of 23% from the 1980s. (4) Black and Hispanic populations have even higher rates. Dental fluorosis is a visible sign that a child was overexposed to fluoride. Pictures of fluorosis:http://www.fluoridealert.org/health/teeth/fluorosis/moderate-severe.html

“The message from Dr. Levy’s work is loud and clear: Don’t give babies fluoridated water,” says Paul Connett, PhD, Executive Director, Fluoride Action Network (FAN). “Unfortunately the ADA has known about these risks for more than four years. Researchers are telling dentists; but dentists are not telling parents.”

This and other little-known adverse fluoride health effects led Connett to co-author, “The Case Against Fluoride: How Hazardous Waste Ended Up in Our Drinking Water and the Bad Science and Powerful Politics that Keep it There,” with James Beck, MD, PhD, professor emeritus of medical physics, University of Alberta and Spedding Micklem, DPhil, professor emeritus at Edinburgh University.

A recent review in The Lancet (5) describes fluoride as “an emerging neurotoxic substance” that may damage the developing brain. The National Research Council (NRC) has identified fluoride as an “endocrine disrupter” that may impair thyroid function. A recent Harvard University study links fluoride to bone cancer (6).

“Approximately half of the newborns and infants I see in practice are fed formula reconstituted with fluoridated water, which I find alarming since the blood-brain barrier is not even developed until 6 months of age, placing these young infants at risk for neurotoxic effects that can be severe and permanent,” says Dr. Yolanda Whyte, a pediatrician in Georgia. “Parents should be warned not to give fluoridated water to babies and children, and they should know that fluoride is also present in juice and other water-reconstituted beverages. I diagnose dental fluorosis on average 5 times daily, but fluoride doesn’t only affect teeth, it can potentially affect the brain and nervous system, kidneys, bones, and other tissues in young children during their critical stages of organ development. A public awareness campaign is urgently needed.”

Thank you, Paul Connett, for having the courage and persistence to speak out about the dangers of fluoridation of drinking water!

Doc Meek, Wednesday, December 29, 2010, South Jordan, Utah, USA

J. Collins Meek, Ph.D. (Doc Meek)
“What if you are smarter than you think?”
Learning Specialist https://docmeek.com

For brain health, ensure heart health (short video):
http://www.amiraclemolecule.com/themeekteam
More on heart health http://www.themeekteam.info
Ph (801) 971-1812 (Jeannette); Fax [801] 282-6026

THE LEARNING CLINIC WORLDWIDE, INC.
CANADA: P.O. Box 3105, Sherwood Park, AB T8H 2T1
TONGA: Mele Taumoepeau, P.O. Box 60, Nuku’alofa
USA: 3688 W 9800 S, #138, South Jordan, UT 84095

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“Innovative Perlmutter Health Center.” – Doc Meek

Wednesday, November 24, 2010. Today I am grateful for David Perlmutter, M.D., a Board-Certified Neurologist with a worldwide practice centered in Naples, on the west coast of Florida.

Images and text below from Dr. Perlmutter’s website: http://www.perlhealth.com

“Raise a Smarter Child by Kindergarten”

Raise a Smarter Child by Kindergarten
by David Perlmutter, MD, FACN, ABIHM Learn More »

“The Better Brain Book”
 

by David Perlmutter, MD, FACN, ABIHM Learn More »

Dr. Perlmutter works innovatively with a wide variety of neurological and nutritional issues and preventive medicine, including helping adults and children overcome learning problems.

This  makes him a hero in my eyes, as I have been helping adults and children triumph over learning difficulties for more than 30 years now.

Thank you, Dr. Perlmutter, for inspiring hope for children and parents and others!

Doc Meek, Wednesday, November 24, 2010, at the Super 8 Motel in Dania Beach, Florida (on the east coast of Florida, opposite Dr. Perlmutter’s office on the west coast at Naples).

J. Collins Meek, Ph.D. (Doc Meek)
“What if you are smarter than you think?”
Learning Specialist https://docmeek.com

For brain health, ensure heart health (short video):
http://www.amiraclemolecule.com/themeekteam
More on heart health http://www.themeekteam.info
Ph (801) 971-1812 (Jeannette); Fax [801] 282-6026

THE LEARNING CLINIC WORLDWIDE, INC.
CANADA: P.O. Box 3105, Sherwood Park, AB T8H 2T1
TONGA: Mele Taumoepeau, P.O. Box 60, Nuku’alofa
USA: 3688 W 9800 S, #138, South Jordan, UT 84095

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“Gratitude Rocks.” – Lee Brower

Wednesday, September 8, 2010. Today I am grateful for people who are able to express gratitude. – Doc Meek

gratitude rock by secretloavideos | 1 year ago | 1,065 views

—————-

Thank you Lee!

Doc Meek, Wednesday, September 8, 2010, at Sherwood Park, Alberta, CANADA

J. Collins Meek, Ph.D. (Doc Meek)
“What if you are smarter than you think?”
Learning Specialist https://docmeek.com

For brain health, ensure heart health (short video):
http://www.amiraclemolecule.com/themeekteam
More on heart health http://www.themeekteam.info
Ph (801) 971-1812 (Jeannette); Fax [801] 282-6026

THE LEARNING CLINIC WORLDWIDE, INC.
CANADA: P.O. Box 3105, Sherwood Park, AB T8H 2T1
TONGA: Mele Taumoepeau, P.O. Box 60, Nuku’alofa
USA: 3688 W 9800 S, #138, South Jordan, UT 84095

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Doc Meek Qualifications Brief

Qualifications Brief for Doc Meek

J. Collins Meek, B.Ed., M.Ed., Ph.D.

CANADA: P.O. Box 3105, Sherwood Park, AB T8H 2T1

US: 3688 W 9800 S, #138, South Jordan, UT 84095-3260

Telephone: (801) 971-1812 (Jeannette); Facsimile: [801] 282-6026

Offering a rare combination of public and private sector background, with demonstrated success in developing programs and strategies for schooling and  family triumphs for children and adults

ACADEMIC QUALIFICATIONS

A.  ADVANCED AND BASIC DEGREES

– Ph.D. (1979); University of Alberta; emphasis on research and administration

– M.Ed. (1972); University of Alberta; emphasis on supervision and finance

– B.Ed. (1969); University of Alberta; emphasis on teaching, English and psychology

B.  SELECTED SPECIALIZED TRAINING

– JOURNEY WORK (2008), The Journey—Evolution Unlimited, Louisville, CO, USA

Areas of emphasis: enlightened therapy; Journey Practitioner skills (220+ hours)

– EDUCATION IN NATIVE CULTURES (1999) BYU-HAWAII, Laie, HI, USA

Areas of emphasis: International Teacher Education Program (60 hours)

– DYNAMIC ASSESSMENT (1997), University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CANADA

Areas of emphasis: educational assessment in a cross-cultural context (45 hours)

– ADULT DEVELOPMENT (1996), University of Athabasca, Calgary, AB, CANADA

Areas of emphasis: adult development across the life-cycle (45 hours)

– FAMILY THERAPY (1995), Holy Cross Hospital, Calgary, AB, CANADA

Areas of emphasis: family systems and family interviews (90 hours)

– PHOTO READING (1993), Learning Strategies Corporation, Wazata, MN, USA

Areas of emphasis: accelerated learning and advanced speed reading (32 hours)

– BRAIN GYM I & II (1993), Educational Kinesiology Foundation, Ventura, CA, USA

Areas of emphasis: use of movement in mitigating learning problems (32 hours)

– NEURO-LINGUISTIC TRAINING (1992), First Institute, San Francisco, CA, USA

Areas of emphasis: training design and presentation for adult audiences (80 hours)

– COGNITIVE RETRAINING (1991), Glenrose Hospital, Edmonton, AB, CANADA

Areas of emphasis: computerized rehabilitation for brain injuries (8 hours)

– NEURO-LINGUISTIC TRAINING (1990), NLP Comprehensive, Boulder, CO, USA

Areas of emphasis: advanced techniques for use in brief therapy (56 hours)

– PSYCHO-LINGUISTICS (1990), Communication Choices, Edmonton, AB, CANADA

Areas of emphasis: brief therapy for children and adults (144 hours)

PEAK PERFORMANCE TEACHING (1988), Learning Pathways, Denver, CO, USA

Areas of emphasis: interventions for children with learning problems (56 hours)

(Continued on Page 2)

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CAREER HIGHLIGHTS                                    J. Collins Meek, Page 2

A.  CONSULTANT/TRAINER for The Learning Clinic & TLC Inc., for 21 years (1988-2010)

Responsibilities: consulting, training, counseling (individual, and family systems)

B.  CONSULTANT/MANAGER for Alberta Education, for 17 years (1971-88)

Responsibilities: planning/research, finance, special education and career counseling projects; served in administrative and teaching posts in cross-cultural contexts

C.  GENERAL MANAGER of Sherwood Enterprises, for 3 years (1968-71)

Responsibilities: development of a small private research & development company; also developed a small residential construction firm and transportation company

D.  SUPERVISOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS for Canadian Utilities Ltd., for 4 years (1964-68)

Responsibilities: taught electrical safety in rural Alberta schools; also supervised public information, media relations, and corporate publications (editor in chief)

E.  TEACHER in Alberta hospitals and Alberta & Yukon public schools, for 4 years (1960-64)

Responsibilities: teaching students in hospitals and public schools in Alberta, and teaching native Canadians in a rural community school in the Yukon Territory, Canada

VOLUNTEER SERVICE

A.  THE LEARNING CLINIC YEARS (1988 to 2010)

Most volunteer activity involved working with adults and children with learning problems; elected to the Board of Directors of the Learning Disabilities Association of Alberta–Edmonton, and chaired the twice-monthly Parent Support Nights; elected Vice President in 1994. Appointed to the Board of Directors of the Learning Disabilities Association of Utah in 2003.

B.  THE SOUTH PACIFIC YEARS (1999 to 2001)

Appointed Adjunct Professor, School of Education, Brigham Young University–Hawaii. Served in the South Pacific in Tonga, as Teacher Development Coordinator for the International Teacher Education Program (ITEP); facilitated university instruction and teaching strategies for teachers/administrators, and private career counseling for students, teachers and administrators.

C.  THE ALBERTA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION YEARS (1971 to 1988)

Most volunteer activity was with professional education associations, both provincially and nationally; contributed to the National Economic Conference of the Canadian Foundation for Economic Education; did career counseling research for the federal Manpower Department.

D.  THE SCHOOL AND PRIVATE SECTOR YEARS (1960 to 1971)

Volunteer tutoring and volunteer career counseling.

Served in church, community affairs and/or grassroots politics throughout all of the above years.

(Continued on Page 3)

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PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS      J. Collins Meek, Page 3

Selected Publications:

CRANDELL, A.K., J.C. MEEK & W. WELCH. (2001). “Teacher Certification Practices for Vocational Education.” Liahona, Tonga: Paper prepared for Church Education System.

FARINE, A., D. FRIESEN & J.C. MEEK. Eds. (1979). Educational Administration: A Comparative View [of 15 countries]. Edmonton: University of Alberta.

MEEK, J.C., & J. MEEK. (2001). “International Teacher Education Program Annual Report.” Liahona, Tonga: Paper prepared for Church Education System.

MEEK, J.C. (2000). “TESL (Teaching English as a Second Language) in Tonga.” Liahona, Tonga: Paper prepared for Church Education System.

MEEK, J.C. (1996). “The Meaning of Life.” Calgary: Paper prepared for Adult Development Course, Athabasca University.

MEEK, J.C. (1995). “The Case of Danielle.” Calgary: Paper prepared for the Family Therapy Training Program, Holy Cross Hospital.

MEEK, J.C. (1993). “Parenting the Difficult Child.” Edmonton: Course prepared for Edmonton Public Schools Continuing Education Classes.

MEEK, J.C. (1992). “Managing Personal Anger.” Edmonton: Course prepared for Edmonton Public Schools Continuing Education Classes.

MEEK, J.C. (1988). “Alberta Teacher Supply & Demand Forecast: 1988-1991.” Edmonton: Alberta Department of Education.

MEEK, J.C. (1987). “Report on Special Education Services in the Province of Alberta.” Edmonton: Alberta Department of Education.

MEEK, J.C. (1984). “Provincial Priority on Education.” Edmonton: Alberta Department of Education, prepared for the Minister of Education and Members of the Legislature.

MEEK, J.C. (1979). “Local School Board Revenues and Expenditures in a Period of Declining Enrolments.” Edmonton: University of Alberta, doctoral dissertation.

MEEK, J.C. (1978). “[Job Satisfaction] Literature Review.” In E.A. Holdaway, Teacher Satisfaction: An Alberta Report. Edmonton: University of Alberta, Chapter 2, pp. 5-33.

MEEK, J.C. (1972). Ed. Evaluation Guidelines. Edmonton: Alberta Department of Education, with original authors Clarence D. Rhodes and Tina Lomas.

MEEK, J.C., G.B. HAWLEY & B.L. STRINGHAM. (1972). “Toward an Improved Management Information System (MIS).” Edmonton: Alberta Department of Education.

MEEK, J.C. (1972). “Unit Cost Analysis of the Implementary Expenditures of an Urban School System.” Edmonton: University of Alberta, master’s thesis.

MEEK, J.C. (1972). Ed. Program Accounting and Budgeting Manual. Edmonton: Alberta Department of Education, with original authors William R. Duke and others.

Selected Presentations:

Numerous public and private workshops and seminars on positive parenting, difficult children, managing personal anger, and defeating depression; also taught editing and finance privately.

AVOCATIONAL INTERESTS: Public speaking, aviation and square dancing.

REFERENCES: Available upon request.

………………………………………………………

Doc Meek, Saturday, July 17, 2010, at Canonville, Utah, USA; running/walking the 5K run (3.1 miles), while extended family does the half marathon (13 miles) from near Tropic, Utah, down to Canonville, Utah, near Bryce Canyon [Bryce Canyon is stunningly beautiful!]


J. Collins Meek III, Ph.D.
“What if you are smarter than you think?”
Learning Specialist: https://docmeek.com
PH (801) 971-1812 (Jeannette); Fax [801] 282-6026
International callers first enter the country code (+1)

THE LEARNING CLINIC WORLDWIDE, INC. (Dr. Meek)
CANADA: P.O. Box 3105, Sherwood Park, AB T8H 2T1
TONGA: P.O. BOX 60, Nuku’alofa (c/o Mele Taumoepeau)
USA: 3688 W 9800 S, #138, South Jordan, UT 84095

Associate Links: http://www.themeekteam.info; & see
short video: http://www.amiraclemolecule.com/themeekteam
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May 2019
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