Posts Tagged ‘Learning Difficulties’

“Why we dance…” – Marijo Moore

Image result for dancing girl image cartoon

“Everyone” frequently reminds us that the movement of the body is essential for good health. We interpret this to mean exercise and we often shy away from “exercise” as it is not engaging for us.

Guess what?

Dancing gives us great body movement and it can be very engaging!

– Doc Meek, Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canada, March 11, 2019

P.S. Here is Marijo Moore, reminding us that dance can be for “everyone”:

“To dance is to pray,

to pray is to heal,

to heal is to give,

to give is to live,

to live is to dance.”

—MariJo Moore

Why We Dance

“And Now… The Rest of the Story…” – Paul Harvey

“What if you are smarter than you think?”

                   J. Collins Meek, Ph.D. (Doc Meek)
                   Your Trusted Learning-Teaching Guide
……………………………………………………………………….

Why is Doc Meek so enthusiastic?

You may recall the radio personality, Paul Harvey, from many years ago now? He would do an intriguing “setup” or introductory preamble that would grab your attention, and then he would invite his rapt audience to hear “the rest of the story” after the station break.

Then he would come back on the air with enthusiasm and say, “And now… the rest of the story!” 🙂

And so… readers have asked me to tell the more about why I am so enthusiastic about rescuing children from the emotional turmoil of their learning disabilities, or as I prefer to say:

Helping children triumph over their emotional pain, and have fun overcoming their learning difficulties or learning differences.

After all, it is much easier to workaround a learning difficulty or a learning difference, then it is to struggle endlessly with a seemingly fixed learning disability.

Right?

There is much more hope in playing with a learning difficulty or a learning difference.

Up the Ladder of “Success”

As I worked on my education degrees, I also worked at becoming an all around educator.

I was a special education teacher, a cross-cultural teacher, a regular school teacher, a school principal, a superintendent of schools, a provincial department of education consultant.

One day, when I was working on a policy statement for a senior official in the provincial department of education, I thought, “Where are the children?”

I had “signed up” to teach children and here I was in the administrative world of education–great work–and where was the direct work with children?

Besides, as I went up through the ranks I could not escape noticing that so many children were suffering in anguish because they either could not learn to read in grade one, or were struggling somewhere along in the grades.

Going “Backwards” into Private Practice

So I made a decision to go into private practice to help kids (and adults) overcome learning difficulties. I was terrified to “go it alone” like this, as I was used to “a regular monthly paycheck.”

It worked out just fine.

I respected the teachers who were trying so hard to help all the kids. And I especially honored the mothers who wanted success for their kids in school with all their hearts and souls.

The mothers “carried the freight” alright and I wanted to help lighten that burden if I could!

I never looked back!

I showed kids face-to-face that they were smarter than they thought!

I also showed teachers and parents how to help their students and children how to use not only their brains, but to remember that we need all of the “4-H’s” to make studying easier and remembering longer:

HEAD/HEART/HANDS/HOPE need connecting for true learning to occur.

Doc Meek, Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canada, Sat, Dec 6, 2014

 

 

“Why do you work so hard to help kids overcome learning difficulties?” – Readers

“What if you are smarter than you think?”

                   J. Collins Meek, Ph.D. (Doc Meek)
                   Your Trusted Learning-Teaching Guide
………………………………………………………………

Why do I work so hard to help kids?

Many people have asked me, “What got you into the work of helping children and adults overcome learning difficulties of all kinds? How did you become a neurological learning specialist?”
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To digress for a moment:
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I prefer to use the words “learning difficulties” rather than “learning disabilities” because “difficulties” seem to encourage hope (if you work on your difficulties, you can probably overcome them). Whereas, “disabilities” seem to denote something permanent, like a crippled leg or something that is not easy to overcome.

So how did I get started?

I guess people are curious to know my career history, especially after they find out that I was very successful all the way through all of my schooling, right from grade 1 through to my postgraduate degrees.
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They wonder why I would care so much about struggling students when I had no experience with that myself.
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 Maybe a seed was planted when I was five years old. I got rheumatic fever and I was too sick to go into grade one with my friends. So my mom homeschooled me all the way through that grade one year. She was intelligent and a good teacher, so I did well, but perhaps I did feel a little bit of an “outsider,” being isolated from my friends at school.
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I do know that kids struggling in school sometimes feel like an “outsider,” alone and isolated in their anguish. Maybe later I resonated with having had some of that anguish when I was young.
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I didn’t know what career to pursue

When I finished my grade 12 year, I wondered what I should take at University.

I loved the English language, and loved being a member of the debating club, so I thought I might make a good lawyer. I didn’t want to be a corporate lawyer. Too dry and dusty I thought. 🙂

I wanted to be a trial lawyer, to handle what I thought would be exciting litigation work in the courtroom. Dramatic arguments in front of the jury and all that. 🙂

But then I was concerned that if I went into criminal law, I might end up accepting tainted or stolen money in order to earn a living. So I set that aside.

I was drawn to the world of healing (perhaps because I was so sick when I was younger), so I wondered if I should try to get into medical school. My Dad, a journeyman electrician, had a modest income and I felt that even if I worked hard to earn extra money (which I was doing all along), I could probably not afford the high tuition fees demanded by medical schools.

I did not want to run up a $200,000 student debt as some of my friends were proposing to do. (The equivalent medical student loan now runs to $350,000 – $400,000, I’m told.)

Yes, I could repay the debt out of my future physician income, but I have always been pretty cautious about debt.

(A friend of mine ran up a huge student loan debt, and then was struck down with an extremely rare medical condition and was unable to finish his medical degree, so he was/is “toast” in terms of income, both present and future.)

As my dear friend said: “It’s difficult to predict… especially the future.” :O

What would have the most impact long-term?

I thought about the impact of being a good lawyer, or being a good doctor, and I felt that the effects of my work with my clients or patients might, in one sense, be relatively short-lived.

Because it began to dawn on me (maybe because of something I was reading) that teaching, even though it wasn’t necessarily well-paying, could have long-term or even permanent effects if done well. All through mortality perhaps, and maybe even on into eternity if I turned out to be an outstandingly inspirational teacher. 🙂

Provided the students were learning well. And loved learning.

I was always such a learning sponge, voracious reader, knowledge “addict,” and ultimately an enthusiastic lifelong learner, that I wanted that for everybody I guess!

I became a fiery advocate of lifelong learning for all, and I realized that for struggling kids in school, that wouldn’t happen if they were learning to hate learning.

All kids should have a chance to love learning!

Doc Meek, Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canada, Nov 25, 2014

“Child drops ball. Parents blame teacher.” – Doc Meek

30 Minute ADHD Consultations

Dear Moms and Dads,

When your child falters it is tempting to blame the teacher.

Here’s what happened with the young boy I was helping overcome his learning difficulties and his attention difficulties in Grade 5 in Emerson Elementary (not the real name of the school).

The boy benefited in 2 ways

The boy was  restless and did not have an easy time staying focused on his desk work.

The boy tapped his pen on his desktop.

The boy drummed his fingers on his desktop.

The boy drove the teacher “crazy.” Not to mention the other kids in the classroom.

Everybody blamed the boy.

Doc Meek to the “rescue”

I said we shouldn’t blame the boy. We should blame the disruptive sound of  the tapping and drumming.

“Brilliant.”

I said the boy needed something quiet to keep his left hand busy while he was trying to use his right hand to do his schoolwork.

I spoke with the boy and we “brilliantly” agreed that if he squeezed a soft rubber ball with his left hand, the active squeezing would help his right hand do the written work.

Boy drops the ball

Boy squeezes ball. Squeezing really helped his right hand do the schoolwork.

Boy drops ball. Ball bounces all over he place. Bouncing ball entertained everybody.

Everybody laughed.

Except the teacher.

After the ball bounced  “brilliantly” the third time, she took the ball away from the boy and put it in her desk drawer.

So much for the “brilliant” ball solution. 😮

Boy could not work without the ball

The parents blamed the teacher.

“Don’t drop the ball,” I “brilliantly” suggested.

“I can’t help it,” protested the boy.

“You’re smarter than I am,” I told the boy. “You solve it.”

Smart boy solves his own problem 

The boy put his mind on it and came up with a truly brilliant solution.

He skewered the ball with a big needle and leather shoe lace and tied the ball to his belt.

Boy squeezed tethered ball.

Boy gets all his schoolwork done.

Everybody’s happy.

So how did the boy benefit in 2 ways?

(1) The boy got a “brilliant” suggestion from a learning specialist.

(2) When the “brilliant” suggestion did not work, the boy learned he could adapt outside suggestions inside his own head. He could adapt outside advice to his own use.

(3) The boy could show real brilliance in solving his own problems (and stop blaming himself and others for his lack of success).

OK, that’s 3 benefits. 😮

Sincerely, Doc Meek

P.S. This same boy began to tap his right foot on the floor while he was trying to do his deskwork. The floor was hard tile. The foot tapping “drove everybody crazy.”

Not possible. You can only drive yourself crazy. 😮

But that’s another story. 😮

30 Minute ADHD Consultations

 

Lady Aquamarine Hides Secret Shame – Doc Meek

30 Minute ADHD Consultations

Image from: Photobucket.com

 

LADY AQUAMARINE HIDES SECRET SHAME

By Dr. J. Collins (“Doc”) Meek

Once upon a time an undersea lady of noble blood pined to become a mortal. Finally, miraculously, her wish was granted. She became mortal and soon joined a women’s precision swim team.

No longer burdened with royal demands and expectations, Lady Aquamarine (now simply known as Andrea) entered upon her human adventure with great gusto. Her undersea swimming talents made for high success on the women’s precision swim team.

Still, mortality was a real challenge in many ways. This created moments in her life that were difficult and joyful, both.

She and her team rose to the top of their rank and were known and lauded far and wide.

Painful Secret

But alas, the Aquamarine Lady had a painful secret. Very painful. Although she was lauded and loved by everyone, she covered her heart in shame within herself. She spoke to no one of her carefully guarded secret…

Life went on.

mermaid photo: Mermaid Mermaid.jpg

Image from: Photobucket.com

One day, she was talking with her mother (Lady Amelia of the North Sea) and told her that though she was highly successful as a precision swimmer (of course!), she was failing as a mortal because she could not read. Her mother reminded her that a return to her former undersea life was not possible.

“I Am So Ashamed”

“Why don’t you seek some way to learn to read?” her mother asked innocently. “Impossible!” exclaimed Andrea, thoroughly discouraged. “I’ve tried everything and nothing works. I’ll never be able to learn to read. I am so ashamed!”

“Better seek out the Old Man of the Sea,” her mother intoned and dove back into her accustomed watery domain.

The Old Man of the Sea was elusive.

Hope at Last

So Andrea asked her mortal friend Andilusia, “What can I possibly do?” Andilusia said, “I’ve heard there is a doctor who helps hopeless cases. The mothers love him because he gives them hope for their troubled children.

Andrea sought far and wide for this hopeful doctor. When she finally found him, she pleaded with him to help her learn to read. He asked her, “What is the one thing on earth you love most?”

Andrea immediately related her adventures as a precision team member. “I love the work and I love the team and I love the challenges.”

Then, for seemingly no reason, she blurted out, “But what I love the most is swimming in the aquamarine waters of the South Pacific islands!” She didn’t tell him this was in her former undersea life of course. She was afraid he would not believe her aquatic story.

The good doctor simply said. “Was it the warm waters that you loved?”

Aquamarine Hues Can Speak! 

“Yes,” mused Andrea, “And mostly the incredible aquamarine hues!”

“You have no idea of the magnificence of the aquamarine hues,” she said, almost weeping.

“Well, it is obvious then,” said the good doctor, “we need to have those inspiring aquamarine hues teach you now to learn to read.”

“What!?” exclaimed Andrea, not willing to believe the good doctor knew that lovely-hued waters could talk with her as in her former undersea life.

Colored Overlays a Big Surprise

“Here,” said the good doctor, “Look at these gel colored overlays that are used to cover spotlights in the world of dramatic productions, presentations and plays.”

“Oh,” blurted Andrea, “Sometimes they put spotlights on us when our precision swim team is performing, especially in the evenings.”

Andrea immediately sought out one of the technicians who operated the spotlights for the team. He showed her an array of gel colored overlays, and she quickly picked several that were an exact match with the aquamarine waters of her South Seas experiences.

Andrea placed one of the aquamarine gels over the first page in a book she longed to read.

The “Small Black Marks” on the Printed Page Now Made Sense!

And she could not believe her eyes! The normal blur of quaint black marks on the page now shimmered gently in a quiet sea. She noticed that some of the quaint black marks (now softened by one of the aquamarine colored overlays) seemed to speak to her softly, seemed to make more sense to her now.

“My love of precision swimming now gives me a love of reading that I never ever thought I could achieve!” she rejoiced.

She wept for joy.

Defeats Dyslexia

With time, she learned individual words and phrases and loved to make sense of the whole sentence, then the whole paragraph and then the whole story.

And so, thanks to the colored overlays she was now using every day, she went merrily on her way! She got on with her life with great precision and great happiness.

Once thoroughly defeated, Lady Aquamarine now thoroughly defeats dyslexia.

……………………………

J Collins Meek, Ph.D., shows children and adults how to defeat dyslexia, ADHD, and many different kinds of learning problems. He is in private practice in Edmonton, Alberta, CANADA. He is an expert at creating innovative protocols to help children and adults triumph over learning difficulties.

30 Minute ADHD Consultations

“Cooperative and Active Learning.” – Rob Plevin

 HARMIN, Merrill (1995), Inspiring Active Learning 
Image from: Amazon.com
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Today I am full of  gratitude for the high impact that cooperative and active learning have for students. I am also grateful for my cyber colleague, Rob Plevin, and my dear friend Merrill Harmin, who encourage all students to be more active in their own learning processes and in overcoming their own learning difficulties.  – Doc Meek, Sherwood Park, Alberta, CANADA, Fri, Aug 16, 2013 

P.S. Nice to get your great newsletter below, Rob!

30MinuteADHDConsultations_440x100

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Dear Doc,

Our summer sale bonanza is coming to an end very soon.

We only have one more product to run at discount plus another ‘secret’ product which I may announce very soon (you don’t want to miss that one if we do decide to run it).

For now, the product we have at HALF OFF is…

Cooperative and Active Learning in Lessons

…and it’s on sale for just THREE MORE DAYS – until Monday 19th August.

This is actually one of my favourite resources – I loved putting this together because it contains a lot of the activities that my students enjoyed when I used to teach. In fact, the activities are so good, I now use them in our live courses and workshops.

The activities are suitable for practically any age group and any subject – with minimal adaptation – and you’ll find them PERFECT if you’re looking for ways to…

  • Get students working together cooperatively (Hint: this is one of the EASIEST ways to reduce behaviour problems and improve participation – even bored, switched off students get a huge kick from working like this).
  • Put more ACTIVITY in your lessons – you’ve no-doubt heard that a large proportion of ‘troublesome’ students tend to be kinesthetic learners. If you try and teach these students using didactic, lecture-style methods they will HATE it! The way to make subjects accessible and appealing to these students is to include some activity in the learning tasks – get them on their feet and ‘doing’ stuff. These activities will enable you to make any subject more ‘hands-on’.
  • Make subject content STICK – It’s obvious, when students are truly engaged in the learning process there is much more chance that the information you give them will actually be remembered. The activities in this resource will give you countless ways to INVOLVE all your students in fun, interactive ways they will LOVE.

The pack includes:

  • Cooperative and active learning templates and activities
  • Fun grouping tips
  • Instructions for managing super-enjoyable and successful group work sessions
  • Active teaching strategies
  • Editable print-ready resource templates
  • Novel ideas for getting ALL your students involved
  • And much much more…

Click here to get your copy for HALF OFF (three more days only)

Best wishes,

Rob Plevin

PS remember, our sale is coming to an end very, very soon so this is your last chance to take advantage of the other products on sale here.
Behaviour Needs LTD

First Floor Offices
North Friarages, Frairgate
Penrith, Cumbria
CA11 7XR
Great Britain

“Homework wars not worth it!” – Doc Meek

Thursday, January 24, 2013. Today I am grateful for those who challenge unproven conventional schooling practices. – Doc Meek

no photo homework.gif

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Homework wars not worth it! 
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I spent more than 30 years helping students at all levels overcome learning difficulties (including school problems and home problems). Except for senior high school level and beyond, homework added nothing and subtracting much from learning. Amazing, given that homework is an almost universal practice, even for students of very young ages.
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Homework often added to the learning problems, rather than relieving them. Sometimes I was reduced to writing a formal letter to the school waiving homework for troubled children. The school would sometimes counter by asking the parents to sign a waiver relieving the school of responsibility for the academic results for the child. They neededn’t have bothered, since the students inevitably did much better minus the burden of after-school and evening homework.
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The problem for students was that they would put in a trying day at school and then face a trying evening with homework, where parents were pushing for what they thought was best and the tired students dragged their feet. The constant battle over homework wore out the parents and the students.
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You would think it would be obvious to everyone that a struggling student in Grades 1-4, say, who faced an evening–every evening–of onerous homework would, in a sense, cease to have a real life. Children need more than school. They need sociality, sports, friendship and fun to grow as well-rounded persons.
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Amazingly, some studies show that elementary school students who do daily homework actually get poorer marks than those who confined their studies to school hours.
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Instead of homework wars, why not declare war on homework? The students benefit, the parents benefit, and the teachers benefit.
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This is a win-win-win strategy!
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Doc Meek, Thurs, Jan 24, 2013, Sherwood Park, Alberta, CANADA

“What if you’re smarter than you think?” – Doc Meek

Thursday, May 10, 2012. Today, I am grateful for parents, teachers & students who endure.  – Doc Meek

Do You or Your Student or Your Child Have Reading Difficulties or Learning Difficulties? 

What if you are smarter than you think?

Einstein had overwhelming learning difficulties at school, and look at the creativity and accomplishment he brought to his life.

strange-albert-einstein.jpg

Click for image of Einstein: http://www.ideachampions.com/weblogs/archives/2011/09/the_timeless_wi.shtml

A series of articles to help mothers, teachers & students with reading problems is at: docmeek.com/mothers

Doc Meek, Thurs, May 10, 2012, Sherwood Park, Alberta, CANADA

“What if you are smarter than you think?”

J. Collins Meek, Ph.D. (Doc Meek)
Neurological Learning Specialist/Facilitator
[“Everyone” says: “He’s fun to work with.”]

         https://docmeek.com

THE LEARNING CLINIC WORLDWIDE, INC.

CANADA: Dr. Meek (587) 400-4707, Edmonton, AB

TONGA: Mele Taumoepeau, P.O. Box 81, Nuku’alofa

USA: Dr. Meek (801) 738-3763, South Jordan, Utah

For optimum brain health, ensure your heart health:

More on heart health: http://www.themeekteam.info

USA: Jeannette (801) 971-1812; South Jordan, Utah

CANADA: Jeannette (587) 333-6923, Calgary, Alberta

CANADA: P.O. Box 3105, Sherwood Park, AB T8H 2T1

=========================================

 

 

Learning Differences Month (October)

Art Gallery

A Rose

A Rose

By: Ryan , Age 17, Hurst, Texas

Rose image from: http://www.ldonline.org/kidsart/A_Rose

From “LD Online”: The world’s leading website on Learning Disabilities and ADHD: http://www.ldonline.org/calendar/ld

Learning Disabilities Awareness [Learning Differences Awareness] Month (October)

Explore below for:

Learning Disabilities Awareness Month [October in CANADA and the USA] is a time where people pay particular attention to children and adults with learning disabilities [learning differences]. During this month, LD OnLine asks each of you to teach one person something new about learning disabilities [learning differences]. You could, for example, introduce them to our newsletter or share an interesting article using the “Email” icon (located in the top right corner of every page).

Information on Learning Disabilities [Learning Differences]

Read A Primer on Learning Disabilities to find out what a learning disability [learning difference] is, what the different types of learning disabilities [learning differences] are, and what causes them.

Read these short articles to learn more about the specific types of learning disabilities [learning differences]:

Our glossary defines the vocabulary of special education.

Our timeline tells the history of learning disabilities.

Back to Top

Fun Activities

Send an e-card to a teacher. The school year has just begun and an e-card about how a teacher has helped your child should get the year off to a great start.

Read a children’s book aloud to a child you know.

Visit our kids’ art gallery. Encourage your child to draw or paint a picture and submit it here.

Visit Sparktop, a website where kids with learning disabilities (or who learn differently) can create things, play games, connect with other kids, and discover new ways to succeed in school …and life.

Back to Top

Inspirational Stories

Here are some success stories about overcoming disabilities to give hope and inspire solutions for similar problems you may be experiencing:

How the special education system helped her child

How a doctor overcame a non-verbal learning disability to pass her medical boards

A person with dyslexia explains why he loves “reading” audio books

How learning about the label of “learning disabilities” helped a college student understand herself

How planning skills helped a man succeed in college, and on the job, despite his learning disabilities

Back to Top

More About Learning Disabilities

Our LD Topics section tells you how to help children learn math,writing and spellingreading, and how to study. You also can find out about:

Here are some other helpful articles:

Subscribe to our free LD Online Monthly Newsletter and Daily NewsLine to receive up-to-date resources and headlines on learning disabilities.

Back to Top

History and Future of LD Awareness Month

October was originally designated in the United States as LD Month in 1985 through a proclamation by President Ronald Reagan. Learning Disabilities Association of Canada has celebrated an LD Month since 1987 and provides a toolkit to help you celebrate. For many years, learning disabilities organizations in the United States used the month to inform the public about learning disabilities through events and proclamations. LD Month is still commemorated in a few states. LD OnLine is considering a plan for public education in LD Month next year. Please contact us if you formally celebrated LD month this year, using “Positive side of LD” as your subject. We may feature your ideas next year.

Back to Top

Thanks to all those who help children and adults with learning challenges!

Doc Meek, Fri, Oct 14, 2011, Sherwood Park, Alberta, CANADA

Learning Disabilities [Learning Differences] Month (October)

Saturday, October 8, 2011. Today I am grateful for the many people who are helping children and adults with with learning differences (often called learning disabilities, which is not exactly how I see these learning challenges that can contain gifts). ~ Doc Meek

Learning Disabilities

Image from: http://www.goodblogger.net/2011/09/11/learning-disabilities/

………………………………

From “LD Online”: The world’s leading website on Learning Disabilities and ADHD: http://www.ldonline.org/calendar/ld

Learning Disabilities Awareness [Learning Differences Awareness] Month (October)

Explore below for:

Learning Disabilities Awareness Month [October in CANADA and the USA] is a time where people pay particular attention to children and adults with learning disabilities [learning differences]. During this month, LD OnLine asks each of you to teach one person something new about learning disabilities [learning differences]. You could, for example, introduce them to our newsletter or share an interesting article using the “Email” icon (located in the top right corner of every page).

Information on Learning Disabilities [Learning Differences]

Read A Primer on Learning Disabilities to find out what a learning disability [learning difference] is, what the different types of learning disabilities [learning differences] are, and what causes them.

Read these short articles to learn more about the specific types of learning disabilities [learning differences]:

Our glossary defines the vocabulary of special education.

Our timeline tells the history of learning disabilities.

Back to Top

Fun Activities

Send an e-card to a teacher. The school year has just begun and an e-card about how a teacher has helped your child should get the year off to a great start.

Read a children’s book aloud to a child you know.

Visit our kids’ art gallery. Encourage your child to draw or paint a picture and submit it here.

Visit Sparktop, a website where kids with learning disabilities (or who learn differently) can create things, play games, connect with other kids, and discover new ways to succeed in school …and life.

Back to Top

Inspirational Stories

Here are some success stories about overcoming disabilities to give hope and inspire solutions for similar problems you may be experiencing:

How the special education system helped her child

How a doctor overcame a non-verbal learning disability to pass her medical boards

A person with dyslexia explains why he loves “reading” audio books

How learning about the label of “learning disabilities” helped a college student understand herself

How planning skills helped a man succeed in college, and on the job, despite his learning disabilities

Back to Top

More About Learning Disabilities

Our LD Topics section tells you how to help children learn math,writing and spellingreading, and how to study. You also can find out about:

Here are some other helpful articles:

Subscribe to our free LD Online Monthly Newsletter and Daily NewsLine to receive up-to-date resources and headlines on learning disabilities.

Back to Top

History and Future of LD Awareness Month

October was originally designated in the United States as LD Month in 1985 through a proclamation by President Ronald Reagan. Learning Disabilities Association of Canada has celebrated an LD Month since 1987 and provides a toolkit to help you celebrate. For many years, learning disabilities organizations in the United States used the month to inform the public about learning disabilities through events and proclamations. LD Month is still commemorated in a few states. LD OnLine is considering a plan for public education in LD Month next year. Please contact us if you formally celebrated LD month this year, using “Positive side of LD” as your subject. We may feature your ideas next year.

Back to Top

Thanks to all those who help children and adults with learning challenges!

Doc Meek, Sat, Oct 8, 2011, South Jordan, Utah, USA

Contact Doc Meek

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